Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users  
Author Message
LeonardoFaoro





PostPosted: Mon Sep 29 18:41:01 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users

We currently have a Small Business Server with 10 User
Accounts. Each user have an internal e-mail



I have used the POP3 connector to add the POP3 accounts



The problem exists with a couple of users who are
sometimes in the office and other times are travelling
away. They need a way to get there POP3


other emloyees might sent them. But the SBS server will

and download it to the Exchange account


Is there a way to keep the e-mails on the ISP server for
a day or two to allow the mobile user to get his e-mail
on his notebook through his Outlook 2002 rather than
using OWA to check his Inbox.

Computer14  
 
 
anonymous





PostPosted: Mon Sep 29 18:41:01 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages on server when downloading pop3 mail.
 
 
Javier





PostPosted: Mon Sep 29 21:50:23 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
on server when downloading pop3 mail.

I don't believe this is correct...

If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.

However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
when you are in the office? There are other ways to
acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
OWA... why do it another way?

My $0.02,

Javier

<< SBS ROCKS!!! >>
 
 
anonymous





PostPosted: Mon Sep 29 22:16:02 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Left a step out sorry....

Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.



>Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
on server when downloading pop3 mail.

I don't believe this is correct...

If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.

However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
when you are in the office? There are other ways to
acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
OWA... why do it another way?

My $0.02,

Javier

<< SBS ROCKS!!! >>
.

 
 
Chad





PostPosted: Mon Sep 29 22:22:54 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not SMTP.
Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is just more pain
than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the laptops to VPN into the
server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila! Another option would be to
create a second profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up
your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by only
downloading message headers, and all email (both external & internal) is
left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.

Remember - keep it simple! ;^)

--
Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!

Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
given enough time and money.
Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.




> Left a step out sorry....
>
> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure
> the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and
> configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to
> leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.
>

>
> >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> on server when downloading pop3 mail.
>
> I don't believe this is correct...
>
> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
>
> However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> OWA... why do it another way?
>
> My $0.02,
>
> Javier
>
> << SBS ROCKS!!! >>
> .


 
 
Javier





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 06:13:43 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users I agree with Chad...

But, if they already using OWA... then they have everything already running.
I don't think it can get any simpler than that. I'm waiting to see a
compelling reason why not use OWA for both (internal/external mail).

My $0.02,

--
-Javier

<< SBS ROCKS !!! >>



> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not SMTP.
> Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is just more pain
> than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the laptops to VPN into the
> server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila! Another option would be to
> create a second profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up
> your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
> connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by only
> downloading message headers, and all email (both external & internal) is
> left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
>
> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>
> --
> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>
> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
> given enough time and money.
> Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
>
>
>

> > Left a step out sorry....
> >
> > Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure
> > the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and
> > configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to
> > leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.
> >

> >
> > >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> > on server when downloading pop3 mail.
> >
> > I don't believe this is correct...
> >
> > If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> > option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> > www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
> >
> > However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> > OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> > mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> > when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> > acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> > OWA... why do it another way?
> >
> > My $0.02,
> >
> > Javier
> >
> > << SBS ROCKS!!! >>
> > .
>
>


 
 
Chad





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 10:26:00 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Since the OP indicated that they wanted to get their email 'into Outlook' -
it is possible that they need offline access to the messages, in which case
OWA doesn't cut it. Otherwise, I agree that OWA is pretty simple ;^)

--
Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!

Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
given enough time and money. Corollary: You are never given enough
time or money.




> I agree with Chad...
>
> But, if they already using OWA... then they have everything already
> running. I don't think it can get any simpler than that. I'm waiting
> to see a compelling reason why not use OWA for both
> (internal/external mail).
>
> My $0.02,
>
>


>> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not
>> SMTP. Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is
>> just more pain than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the
>> laptops to VPN into the server, then run Outlook over the VPN.
>> Voila! Another option would be to create a second profile in
>> Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up your SBS to accept
>> incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to connect to your
>> server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by only downloading
>> message headers, and all email (both external & internal) is left on
>> Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
>>
>> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>>
>> --
>> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>>
>> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
>> given enough time and money.
>> Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
>>
>>
>>

>>> Left a step out sorry....
>>>
>>> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything.
>>> Configure the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server
>>> and
>>> configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client
>>> to leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem
>>> solved.
>>>

>>>
>>> >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
>>> on server when downloading pop3 mail.
>>>
>>> I don't believe this is correct...
>>>
>>> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
>>> option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
>>> www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
>>>
>>> However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
>>> OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
>>> mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
>>> when you are in the office? There are other ways to
>>> acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
>>> OWA... why do it another way?
>>>
>>> My $0.02,
>>>
>>> Javier
>>>
>>> << SBS ROCKS!!! >>
>>> .


 
 
Crystal





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 11:00:38 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users I am having a similar problem. On my clients laptop we have Outlook
configured to get exchange mail using the pop3. This use to be working
until recently. We have the option on the clients Outlook, checked to leave
a copy of the message on the server. This allowed my user to receive email
using the SMTP on his work workstation and then also receive the same
messages on his laptop when at home. This was working until I applied the
recent post sp3 update. Now I get the message, "Report error 0x80042104
'Your email server does not have the features required to allow messages to
be left on the server'" Does anyone know how to help?





> I agree with Chad...
>
> But, if they already using OWA... then they have everything already
running.
> I don't think it can get any simpler than that. I'm waiting to see a
> compelling reason why not use OWA for both (internal/external mail).
>
> My $0.02,
>
> --
> -Javier
>
> << SBS ROCKS !!! >>
>


> > The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not
SMTP.
> > Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is just more
pain
> > than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the laptops to VPN into the
> > server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila! Another option would be
to
> > create a second profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open
up
> > your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
> > connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by only
> > downloading message headers, and all email (both external & internal) is
> > left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
> >
> > Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
> >
> > --
> > Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
> >
> > Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
> > given enough time and money.
> > Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
> >
> >
> >

> > > Left a step out sorry....
> > >
> > > Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure
> > > the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and
> > > configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to
> > > leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.
> > >

> > >
> > > >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> > > on server when downloading pop3 mail.
> > >
> > > I don't believe this is correct...
> > >
> > > If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> > > option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> > > www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
> > >
> > > However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> > > OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> > > mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> > > when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> > > acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> > > OWA... why do it another way?
> > >
> > > My $0.02,
> > >
> > > Javier
> > >
> > > << SBS ROCKS!!! >>
> > > .
> >
> >
>
>


 
 
Reda





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 11:44:30 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users
Thank you all for the feedback ...

Well ... This is what I am going to do and tell me your
comments ...

1. Back up the user personal folder to a local PST file
on his notebook

2. Delete his mail box on the Exchange Server

3. Open his Outlook and configure it with his 2 different



4. Log off Outlook

5. Add the user Exchange Mail box Account again


6. Go to the User Control Panel, and under Mail, I
connect him to the Exchange Server.

The problem with the above solution is that the local
mail will be delivered to his Local PST file whenever his
is connected to the company's network whereas the OWA
will be limited in terms of usability from outside of the
company except for checking the Public Folders ...

Please advice if this idea is OK or if you have other
comments.

Reda Hanna


>-----Original Message-----
>Since the OP indicated that they wanted to get their
email 'into Outlook' -
>it is possible that they need offline access to the
messages, in which case
>OWA doesn't cut it. Otherwise, I agree that OWA is
pretty simple ;^)
>
>--
>Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>
>Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can
be overcome
>given enough time and money. Corollary: You are never
given enough
>time or money.
>
>
>

>> I agree with Chad...
>>
>> But, if they already using OWA... then they have
everything already
>> running. I don't think it can get any simpler than
that. I'm waiting
>> to see a compelling reason why not use OWA for both
>> (internal/external mail).
>>
>> My $0.02,
>>
>>



>>> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect
their mail - not
>>> SMTP. Any method to send email back out to an ISP
mail server is
>>> just more pain than it's worth. If it were me, I'd
set up the
>>> laptops to VPN into the server, then run Outlook over
the VPN.
>>> Voila! Another option would be to create a second
profile in
>>> Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up your
SBS to accept
>>> incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
connect to your
>>> server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by
only downloading
>>> message headers, and all email (both external &
internal) is left on
>>> Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
>>>
>>> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>>>
>>> --
>>> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>>>
>>> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem
can be overcome
>>> given enough time and money.
>>> Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>>> Left a step out sorry....
>>>>
>>>> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do
everything.
>>>> Configure the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to
outside server
>>>> and
>>>> configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail.
Tell your client
>>>> to leave a copy of downloaded messages on server.
Done, problem
>>>> solved.
>>>>

>>>>
>>>> >Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy
of messages
>>>> on server when downloading pop3 mail.
>>>>
>>>> I don't believe this is correct...
>>>>
>>>> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's
no such
>>>> option available... you need a 3rd party
product (such as
>>>> www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
>>>>
>>>> However, maybe I'm missing something here but
why do you
>>>> OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for
external
>>>> mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything...
just like
>>>> when you are in the office? There are other
ways to
>>>> acomplish what you want, but since you already
setted up
>>>> OWA... why do it another way?
>>>>
>>>> My $0.02,
>>>>
>>>> Javier
>>>>
>>>> << SBS ROCKS!!! >>
>>>> .
>
>
>.
>
 
 
anonymous





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 12:06:01 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Chad - They are not sending email "back out" to an smtp server, it's being forwarded the first time they send it; I'm not sure how you are arriving at this conclusion unless you are refering to the remote users, who should be using their isp's smtp server. Setting up vpn access is much more tedious than configuring the smtp connector (provided that they even have or want a vpn for that matter). Not to mention that mapi can be very slow at times across a vpn.

Reda - All you need to do is configure smtp to forward to a smart host. From system manager, go to the properties of your default smtp virtual server, then delivery/advanced. Enter a smart host for your outbound pop3 mail (email.company.com). Configure outlook clients to retreive the pop3 mail and leave a copy of downloaded messages. Your remote users should be configuring outlook to use their isp's smtp server while abroad. This solution works flawlessly if done right. Easier than setting up a vpn I think and faster too. Chad's solution could be used as well; a vpn is a viable solution if you had to go that way.

Good luck!



The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not SMTP.
Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is just more pain
than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the laptops to VPN into the
server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila! Another option would be to
create a second profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up
your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by only
downloading message headers, and all email (both external & internal) is
left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.

Remember - keep it simple! ;^)

--
Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!

Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
given enough time and money.
Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.




> Left a step out sorry....
>> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure
> the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and
> configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to
> leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.

>>>Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> on server when downloading pop3 mail.
>> I don't believe this is correct...
>> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
>> However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> OWA... why do it another way?
>> My $0.02,
>> Javier
>><< SBS ROCKS!!! >>> .


.

 
 
anonymous





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 16:21:02 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Reda,

Make sure you check the box "Attempt direct delivery before sending to smart host" underneath the spot where you added the smart host. Also, are you receiving the incoming mail before it errors out? Make sure the isp you are forwarding to is not rejecting your forwards.




John / Chad

I have tried John's solution and added a Smart Host,
which is mail.company.com, to the Default SMTP Advanced
Delivery Settings ...

Then, I configured the Outlook Client, first with the two


Exchange Account using the Mail Icon on the Control
Panel ...

When I try to Send/Receive, I get the message "The
connection to the Server was interrupted report error
0x800CCC0F ... When I try to use the Test Account button
under the Outlook 2002 Acoounts, I get the error Unable
to logon to outgoing mail server (SMTP)

Appreciate your advice ...

Reda



>-----Original Message-----
>Chad - They are not sending email "back out" to an smtp
server, it's being forwarded the first time they send it;
I'm not sure how you are arriving at this conclusion
unless you are refering to the remote users, who should
be using their isp's smtp server. Setting up vpn access
is much more tedious than configuring the smtp connector
(provided that they even have or want a vpn for that
matter). Not to mention that mapi can be very slow at
times across a vpn.
>>Reda - All you need to do is configure smtp to forward
to a smart host. From system manager, go to the
properties of your default smtp virtual server, then
delivery/advanced. Enter a smart host for your outbound
pop3 mail (email.company.com). Configure outlook clients
to retreive the pop3 mail and leave a copy of downloaded
messages. Your remote users should be configuring
outlook to use their isp's smtp server while abroad.
This solution works flawlessly if done right. Easier
than setting up a vpn I think and faster too. Chad's
solution could be used as well; a vpn is a viable
solution if you had to go that way.
>>Good luck!

>> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect
their mail - not SMTP.
> Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail
server is just more pain
> than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the
laptops to VPN into the
> server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila!
Another option would be to
> create a second profile in Outlook on the remote
users' laptops. Open up
> your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the
second profile to
> connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow
connections by only
> downloading message headers, and all email (both
external & internal) is
> left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
>> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>> --
> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem
can be overcome
> given enough time and money.
> Corollary: You are never given enough time or
money.

>> Left a step out sorry....
>>> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do
everything. Configure
>> the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to
outside server and
>> configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail.
Tell your client to
>> leave a copy of downloaded messages on server.
Done, problem solved.

>>>>Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of
messages
>> on server when downloading pop3 mail.
>>> I don't believe this is correct...
>>> If he's refering to the POP3 connector,
there's no such
>> option available... you need a 3rd party
product (such as
>> www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
>>> However, maybe I'm missing something here
but why do you
>> OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for
external
>> mail? Why don't you use OWA for
everything... just like
>> when you are in the office? There are other
ways to
>> acomplish what you want, but since you
already setted up
>> OWA... why do it another way?
>>> My $0.02,
>>> Javier
>>><< SBS ROCKS!!! >>> .
>>> .
>>.
>
.

 
 
Chad





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 17:26:33 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Hi John -

I've re-read this thread, and I'm obviously missing something here. We're
all here to learn, and we know that there's more than one way to skin a cat,
so I'm hoping that you can clarify this for me. I can identify where I'm
lost:

[quote]
Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything. Configure the
SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and configure clients
to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to leave a copy of
downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.
[quote]

I'll gladly admit that I don't see exactly what you're suggesting here,
specifically in regard to configuring the SMTP connector to forward pop3
mail to the outside server. I follow your suggestion to drop the POP3
connector and just use SMTP (thus hosting their own mail). After that, I'm
just not connecting the dots. What pop3 mail are we forwarding after we
stop using pop3? What outside server are you referring to? (Because once
they switch to pure SMTP mail, their email is no longer stored on any server
besides their SBS). In which case, the remote users would need to connect
to their SBS to retrieve their mail. Is that the method you are
recommending? If so, my only comment is that depending on the tech level of
the users (and their tendency to 'play') - if the 'leave messages on server'
option is deselected, all of the email from their exchange mailbox will be
downloaded to the local pst. In addition, we haven't dealt with what to do
when these remote users are back in the office and connected to the LAN.
Are we still going to have Outlook pop-ing the server? Or are we going to
have two separate Outlook profiles (1 for POP / 1 for Exchange)?

Like I said, I'm just not following your recommendation - so hopefully you
can clear this up for me.

--
Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!

Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
given enough time and money.
Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.




> Chad - They are not sending email "back out" to an smtp server, it's
> being forwarded the first time they send it; I'm not sure how you are
> arriving at this conclusion unless you are refering to the remote
> users, who should be using their isp's smtp server. Setting up vpn
> access is much more tedious than configuring the smtp connector
> (provided that they even have or want a vpn for that matter). Not to
> mention that mapi can be very slow at times across a vpn.
>
> Reda - All you need to do is configure smtp to forward to a smart
> host. From system manager, go to the properties of your default smtp
> virtual server, then delivery/advanced. Enter a smart host for your
> outbound pop3 mail (email.company.com). Configure outlook clients to
> retreive the pop3 mail and leave a copy of downloaded messages. Your
> remote users should be configuring outlook to use their isp's smtp
> server while abroad. This solution works flawlessly if done right.
> Easier than setting up a vpn I think and faster too. Chad's solution
> could be used as well; a vpn is a viable solution if you had to go
> that way.
>
> Good luck!
>

>
> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail -
> not SMTP. Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail
> server is just more pain than it's worth. If it were me, I'd
> set up the laptops to VPN into the server, then run Outlook over
> the VPN. Voila! Another option would be to create a second
> profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops. Open up your
> SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
> connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections
> by only downloading message headers, and all email (both
> external & internal) is left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed
> up.
>
> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>
> --
> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>
> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be
> overcome given enough time and money.
> Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
>
>
>

> > Left a step out sorry....
> >> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything.
> Configure > the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside
> server and > configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail.
> Tell your client to > leave a copy of downloaded messages on

> ----- >>>Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> > on server when downloading pop3 mail.
> >> I don't believe this is correct...
> >> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> > option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> > www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
> >> However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> > OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> > mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> > when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> > acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> > OWA... why do it another way?
> >> My $0.02,
> >> Javier
> >><< SBS ROCKS!!! >>> .
>
>
> .


 
 
Javier





PostPosted: Tue Sep 30 18:14:32 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users John... there's something here that's not clear.

ISP POP3 servers <- SBS servers download POP3 mail from them.
If you set up to the SBS server to forward again to the outside you will end
up on the same cycle.

Even if you weren't using POP3... then with SMTP the mx record for the
domain will be pointing to same SBS server so you can't forward to another
server because it will eventually come back (the smarthost idea). The only
way to do what you are mentioning is using another domain to forward mail
to... but that's something totally different.

--
-Javier

<< SBS ROCKS !!! >>



> Chad - They are not sending email "back out" to an smtp server, it's being
forwarded the first time they send it; I'm not sure how you are arriving at
this conclusion unless you are refering to the remote users, who should be
using their isp's smtp server. Setting up vpn access is much more tedious
than configuring the smtp connector (provided that they even have or want a
vpn for that matter). Not to mention that mapi can be very slow at times
across a vpn.
>
> Reda - All you need to do is configure smtp to forward to a smart host.
From system manager, go to the properties of your default smtp virtual
server, then delivery/advanced. Enter a smart host for your outbound pop3
mail (email.company.com). Configure outlook clients to retreive the pop3
mail and leave a copy of downloaded messages. Your remote users should be
configuring outlook to use their isp's smtp server while abroad. This
solution works flawlessly if done right. Easier than setting up a vpn I
think and faster too. Chad's solution could be used as well; a vpn is a
viable solution if you had to go that way.
>
> Good luck!
>

>
> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to collect their mail - not
SMTP.
> Any method to send email back out to an ISP mail server is just more
pain
> than it's worth. If it were me, I'd set up the laptops to VPN into
the
> server, then run Outlook over the VPN. Voila! Another option would
be to
> create a second profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops.
Open up
> your SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the second profile to
> connect to your server via IMAP. It works for slow connections by
only
> downloading message headers, and all email (both external & internal)
is
> left on Exchange, allowing it to be backed up.
>
> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
>
> --
> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
>
> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can be overcome
> given enough time and money.
> Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
>
>
>

> > Left a step out sorry....
> >> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do everything.
Configure
> > the SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server and
> > configure clients to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client
to
> > leave a copy of downloaded messages on server. Done, problem
solved.

> >>>Configure the smtp connector to leave a copy of messages
> > on server when downloading pop3 mail.
> >> I don't believe this is correct...
> >> If he's refering to the POP3 connector, there's no such
> > option available... you need a 3rd party product (such as
> > www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
> >> However, maybe I'm missing something here but why do you
> > OWA for checking local mail and Outlook for external
> > mail? Why don't you use OWA for everything... just like
> > when you are in the office? There are other ways to
> > acomplish what you want, but since you already setted up
> > OWA... why do it another way?
> >> My $0.02,
> >> Javier
> >><< SBS ROCKS!!! >>> .
>
>
> .
>


 
 
Javier





PostPosted: Wed Oct 01 22:38:17 CDT 2003 Top

smallbiz >> Adding POP3 Account to Exchange Users Reda... that's what I understood when I first read your post. If you really
need to use Outlook... then follow Chad's suggestion (if offline mail access
is not essential... then OWA would work great for both).

> I have inslatted SBS 2000 and configured it to use SMTP
> for Internet Mail.

This is misleading... you are only using SMTP for sending mail (something
that everybody does -via smarthost or DNS-). When somebody says that they
are using SMTP they usually mean that they are hosting their own mail (so
SMTP is used for receiving too). If you are using POP3 then you are not in
this situation. John's suggestion appears to require to change from POP3 to
SMTP... but I still don't get what he is trying to say.

Bottomline... the MS POP3 connector will not allow you to leave the messages
in the server. You need a third-party program to do it. In my opinion... I
wouldn't do it even if I could. The only thing that occurs to me that you
can do easily is to create a second account in your ISP's POP3 server that
is not downloaded by the server and then forward all mail from an specific
account to there... from there you can do whatever you like.

My $0.02,

--
-Javier

<< SBS ROCKS !!! >>





> Again ... Maybe if I described the situation differently,
> it will be clearer ...
>
> I have inslatted SBS 2000 and configured it to use SMTP
> for Internet Mail.
>
> Our Internet mail is stored at our ISP.
>
> I have configured the POP3 connector to route the


> the Internet Mail every 15 minutes and direct it to the
> local domain usesrs.
>
> My problem is with mobile users who have Notebooks that
> plug to the company's LAN, and hence they get both local
> and Internet Emails, but when they are out of the office,
> they cannot use except OWA to check their mail whereas
> they want to use Outlook 2002 for their work. I have
> adjusted their configuration to maintain an offline copy
> of their mailbox for their Outlook to work when they are
> not connected to the Company's network.
>
> Is there a way to have them use their Outlook 2002 to get
> their messages when they are out of the office? as I
> think that there is no way to keep the mail on the ISP
> Server except by using a third party program ...
>
> Appreciate your recommendations ...
>
> Reda
>
>
> >-----Original Message-----
> >Hi John -
> >
> >I've re-read this thread, and I'm obviously missing
> something here. We're
> >all here to learn, and we know that there's more than
> one way to skin a cat,
> >so I'm hoping that you can clarify this for me. I can
> identify where I'm
> >lost:
> >
> >[quote]
> >Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do
> everything. Configure the
> >SMTP connector to forward pop3 mail to outside server
> and configure clients
> >to receive incoming pop3 mail. Tell your client to
> leave a copy of
> >downloaded messages on server. Done, problem solved.
> >[quote]
> >
> >I'll gladly admit that I don't see exactly what you're
> suggesting here,
> >specifically in regard to configuring the SMTP connector
> to forward pop3
> >mail to the outside server. I follow your suggestion to
> drop the POP3
> >connector and just use SMTP (thus hosting their own
> mail). After that, I'm
> >just not connecting the dots. What pop3 mail are we
> forwarding after we
> >stop using pop3? What outside server are you referring
> to? (Because once
> >they switch to pure SMTP mail, their email is no longer
> stored on any server
> >besides their SBS). In which case, the remote users
> would need to connect
> >to their SBS to retrieve their mail. Is that the method
> you are
> >recommending? If so, my only comment is that depending
> on the tech level of
> >the users (and their tendency to 'play') - if the 'leave
> messages on server'
> >option is deselected, all of the email from their
> exchange mailbox will be
> >downloaded to the local pst. In addition, we haven't
> dealt with what to do
> >when these remote users are back in the office and
> connected to the LAN.
> >Are we still going to have Outlook pop-ing the server?
> Or are we going to
> >have two separate Outlook profiles (1 for POP / 1 for
> Exchange)?
> >
> >Like I said, I'm just not following your recommendation -
> so hopefully you
> >can clear this up for me.
> >
> >--
> >Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
> >
> >Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical problem can
> be overcome
> >given enough time and money.
> >Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
> >
> >
> >

> >> Chad - They are not sending email "back out" to an
> smtp server, it's
> >> being forwarded the first time they send it; I'm not
> sure how you are
> >> arriving at this conclusion unless you are refering to
> the remote
> >> users, who should be using their isp's smtp server.
> Setting up vpn
> >> access is much more tedious than configuring the smtp
> connector
> >> (provided that they even have or want a vpn for that
> matter). Not to
> >> mention that mapi can be very slow at times across a
> vpn.
> >>
> >> Reda - All you need to do is configure smtp to forward
> to a smart
> >> host. From system manager, go to the properties of
> your default smtp
> >> virtual server, then delivery/advanced. Enter a smart
> host for your
> >> outbound pop3 mail (email.company.com). Configure
> outlook clients to
> >> retreive the pop3 mail and leave a copy of downloaded
> messages. Your
> >> remote users should be configuring outlook to use
> their isp's smtp
> >> server while abroad. This solution works flawlessly
> if done right.
> >> Easier than setting up a vpn I think and faster too.
> Chad's solution
> >> could be used as well; a vpn is a viable solution if
> you had to go
> >> that way.
> >>
> >> Good luck!
> >>

> >>
> >> The problem is that the OP is using POP3 to
> collect their mail -
> >> not SMTP. Any method to send email back out to an
> ISP mail
> >> server is just more pain than it's worth. If it
> were me, I'd
> >> set up the laptops to VPN into the server, then
> run Outlook over
> >> the VPN. Voila! Another option would be to
> create a second
> >> profile in Outlook on the remote users' laptops.
> Open up your
> >> SBS to accept incoming IMAP, and configure the
> second profile to
> >> connect to your server via IMAP. It works for
> slow connections
> >> by only downloading message headers, and all
> email (both
> >> external & internal) is left on Exchange, allowing it
> to be backed
> >> up.
> >>
> >> Remember - keep it simple! ;^)
> >>
> >> --
> >> Chad A Gross - SBS Rocks!
> >>
> >> Lerman's Law of Technology: Any technical
> problem can be
> >> overcome given enough time and money.
> >> Corollary: You are never given enough time or
> money.
> >>
> >>
> >>

> >> > Left a step out sorry....
> >> >> Don't use pop3 at all, let the smtp service do
> everything.
> >> Configure > the SMTP connector to forward pop3
> mail to outside
> >> server and > configure clients to receive
> incoming pop3 mail.
> >> Tell your client to > leave a copy of downloaded
> messages on
> >> server. Done, problem solved. >> -----

> >> ----- >>>Configure the smtp connector to leave a
> copy of messages
> >> > on server when downloading pop3 mail.
> >> >> I don't believe this is correct...
> >> >> If he's refering to the POP3 connector,
> there's no such
> >> > option available... you need a 3rd party
> product (such as
> >> > www.popbeamer.com) to acomplish this.
> >> >> However, maybe I'm missing something here
> but why do you
> >> > OWA for checking local mail and Outlook
> for external
> >> > mail? Why don't you use OWA for
> everything... just like
> >> > when you are in the office? There are
> other ways to
> >> > acomplish what you want, but since you
> already setted up
> >> > OWA... why do it another way?
> >> >> My $0.02,
> >> >> Javier
> >> >><< SBS ROCKS!!! >>> .
> >>
> >>
> >> .
> >
> >
> >.
> >